Change a life. Empower students with Bipolar Disorder who cannot afford a college education.

The Foundation Pools donors’ contributions and awards scholarships to students with a diagnosis of Bipolar Disorder who are currently in treatment. The students may be graduating high school seniors, or freshmen, sophomores or juniors attending college. These awards can be used toward tuition, fees, books, and room & board. Scholarships are usually $2300, depends on yearly contributions.

To be eligible for the Jared Monroe Foundation Scholarship a student must:

A) Be attending a college or university on a full-time basis by August of 2020.

B) Submit an answer to the essay question no later than 11:59 PM EST on May 1, 2020

C) Be currently in your last year of high school or a freshman, sophomore, or junior in college/university.

D) Have a dx of Bipolar Disorder and currently receiving treatment

2019 Jared Monroe Scholars

Jessica R.

2019 Scholarship recipient Jessica Rodriguez, age 34, is a survivor of foster care and recovered from a drug addiction. She was formally diagnosed with Bipolar at the age of 29.  She is a Public Speaker, Life Coach, and mother in Houston, Texas.  She is currently finishing her BA in Psychology and entering a Master program at St. Thomas University in fall for Mental Health Counseling. She believes that there’s a light in all of us and we decide our future despite not choosing our past. Live, life, learn and love.

Chloe W.

Chloe Weigel is a sophomore at Arizona State University studying Family and Human Development as well as a member of Chi Omega a women’s sorority.  She is from Tucson, Arizona. Her mother has Bipolar Disorder 2 getting severe depression and mild mania. At 16, she began noticing changes in herself as well and was eventually diagnosed with depression.   She is planning on becoming a child life specialist or hospital social worker.   Chloe reports even with facing depression, the biggest joy in her life is helping others face their battles.

2018 Jared Monroe Scholars

Emmah M.

Emmah Meyer a sophomore at Arizona State University studying Urban Planning and Metropolitan Studies as well as a member of Chi Omega a women’s fraternity. She is from Napa, California a small town in the northern San Francisco Bay Area.   Her freshman year she began to exhibit unreasonable outbursts of rage, the constant feeling of flailing about through life rather than really living, and burned bridges with various friends. This was then when her mother suggested she seek medical help. She was officially diagnosed with bipolar disorder in January of 2017.
It hasn’t been easy but she continues to learn more about her triggers, continue to make strides towards her goals. She reminds herself to put her mental health first. She wants to help her peers see that bipolar disorder is manageable and there is always going to be a light in the world no matter how low you may feel.

Neve B.

Neve Brown  just graduating high school in Frisco, Texas and will be attending University of Delaware this fall.  She will be majoring in Political Science with a concentration in Global Politics and minor in Women’s and Gender Studies. She plans on participating in the 4 +1 Public Policy program to earn Master’s degree.  She was diagnosed with Bipolar Disorder in November of 2014. She has faced discrimination  due to the many stigmas associated with having a mental illness. She is determined to persevere through the challenges and build a more resilient version of herself.  She believes it is part of her responsibility having bipolar disorder to speak out against the stigma and to normalize what it means to be “Bipolar”.

2017 Jared Monroe Scholar

In 2017, The Jared Monroe Foundation  awarded 2 exemplary young adults diagnosed with Bipolar Disorder with a $1000 academic scholarship.  These individuals  exemplified the characteristics of Jared Monroe’s passion to rise above their diagnoses.  With your donations, The Jared Monroe Foundation will continue to award scholarships to college students with a diagnosis of Bipolar Disorder that exhibit aspirations to make a difference in this world standing tall in the face of mental illness.

Danny R.

This fall I will be enrolling at College of the Canyons. Although I was accepted into a school in the MidWest, I chose to stay because it did not feel like home— COC is a great school so I need not to worry. Right now, I want to major in Business Economics and hopefully transfer out to UCLA or UC Irvine. I feel like Business Economics is my calling because I want to go into Hospital Administration and help out with the way hospitals are ran in the United States. I have been on a 72 hour hold and I saw my psychiatrist three times in the four days (they kept me for a little bit longer because it was a weekend) and the therapist once. That is in no way “help.” The saddest part is that my story isn’t too different from many others. 72 hour holds are not what they should be and the flaws in the way we treat mental health is ridiculous to me and I consider them the reason why we lose beautiful souls.

This fall I will be enrolling at College of the Canyons. Although I was accepted into a school in the MidWest, I chose to stay because it did not feel like home— COC is a great school so I need not to worry. Right now, I want to major in Business Economics and hopefully transfer out to UCLA or UC Irvine. I feel like Business Economics is my calling because I want to go into Hospital Administration and help out with the way hospitals are ran in the United States. I have been on a 72 hour hold and I saw my psychiatrist three times in the four days (they kept me for a little bit longer because it was a weekend) and the therapist once. That is in no way “help.” The saddest part is that my story isn’t too different from many others. 72 hour holds are not what they should be and the flaws in the way we treat mental health is ridiculous to me and I consider them the reason why we lose beautiful souls. 

People should not be afraid to reach out for help— It’s hard enough as it is, but to receive “help” that only hurts them is ridiculous. We spend the most money on our healthcare out of any nation in the world and yet we treat people with mental illness by basically locking them away and popping pills in them. I almost wish my story was an outlier, but it’s not and it needs to change— and I consider it to be my calling to create change. Living life with a mental illness is rough, but it has only made me stronger. My junior and senior year was rough. I transferred schools twice within a year because I felt as though my old school did not have my best interests in mind, and being in a war with my BiPolarism, I was desperately losing. The light that I had for most of my life had left me. While I was “stable,” an empty feeling always resonated within me. Education had always been my outlet, so I carried on despite my struggles. When I should have been focusing on school, my junior year consisted of many trips to the therapist’s office, trying various medications. Many nights were spent hysterically suffering due to adverse side effects and feelings of hopelessness. I saw no solution. This dark moment in my life nearly led to me taking my life away. My life felt like a maze; I had no clue how to get out. As you can see, my transcript reflects my fall. I was merely a ticking time bomb waiting to go off and had this happened any later in my life, the consequences could have been much worse. Never had I felt more as a human than a person. I was a walking shell recovering, and then one day, I knew I had a mission: to help out those with mental illness, which is where my idea for “The Sunshine Project” stemmed from. The more vocal I had become about my condition, the more people opened up about theirs too. I knew my job was to serve as a leader for the community and help out others that were in my position. The Sunshine Project consists of me and a few friends I gathered and we deliver sunflower care packages. So far we have delivered 357 sunflowers, and my work has gone to be recognized even when that was never my intention. ABC 7 News chose me to be their “Cool Kid” and gave me a segment on the news. My biggest prize though is that I have been able to touch the lives of 357 individuals. From peers to parents, the care packages have been able to serve as a medium to help people reach out for the help they need. I am only one person with a mission to help out as many people as I can, but bigger than that, I seek to make improvements where they are needed. No experience is a tragedy if we can improve ourselves from it. I know I’m playing with fire by being open about my health condition, but we need people to take on that role because if we don’t— we lose lives. If sharing my story means I can help even just one person, then it will have been worth all the effort.

Apply For Scholarships

Applications for the 2019-2020 academic year are now open. If you wish to apply for a Scholarship for the 2019-2020 academic year, please download application and submit to thejaredmonroefoundation@gmail.com by May 1, 2020. Winners announced no later than May 30, 2020 (Jared’s birthday).